Lost and Found

Lola Margaret Delaware was lost. She clutched her stuffed grey bunny and chewed the top of its ear, which was threadbare and stained from the habit, and lifted her gaze to the top of the building she stood before. Stone monkeys with scrunched-up faces jutted from the corners and eyed Lola with disdain. But that didn’t put her off. She was sure her mother was inside.

Pulling bunny tighter she pushed the heavy door and stepped into a glistening white foyer. A man in a black suit and a pale face smiled from behind a counter. ‘Lola, I’m so glad you finally found us.’

PHOTO PROMPT © Roger Bultot

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This piece was written for the Friday Fictioneers hosted by the lovely Rochelle Wisoff-Fields – Addicted to Purple.

Each week a photo prompt is given and the challenge is write a flash fiction piece of no more than one hundred words.

Find other Friday Fictioneer stories here.

Author: Jennifer Kennedy

Mother, teacher and writer. I love all my jobs but writing holds a special place in my heart. I hope you enjoy reading my short stories as much as I enjoy writing them!

61 thoughts on “Lost and Found”

  1. neilmacdon – I have published stories in several magazine, including Structo and Gold Dust. I am the author of five books about Latin America and the Caribbean, and most recently Cautionary Tales for Development Folk, a collection of humorous and instructive stories drawn from a career in international aid. I have had a varied working career including science, journalism and publishing until I settled into the aid world. He is now turning to fiction writing full time, and have been serving an apprenticeship to the craft. I was born in Scotland, raised in Jamaica, and have lived and worked in England, the US and South Africa. I now live in a cottage in Surrey, England together with my wife and the obligatory cat and dog.
    neilmacdon says:

    The sense of something bad about to happen is told with admirable quietness

  2. Iain Kelly – Canonbie Ave, East Kilbride, South Lanarkshire G74 4, UK – 41 year old writer, avid film viewer and book reader, employed in the media industry as a television editor.
    Iain Kelly says:

    I got the feeling Lola was fulfilling a destiny, in an ‘Omen’-type way. Creepy!

  3. rochellewisoff – Missouri – A Kansas City native, Rochelle's been married to her first husband Jan for nearly 50 years. A trained graphic artist, her passion is creating not only watercolor paintings, but word pictures as well. Her most recent novel about a middle-aged woman battling anorexia is under contract with literary agent Diane Nine www.ninespeakers.com
    rochellewisoff says:

    Dear Jennifer,

    You’ve left me in fear of what will happen to poor Lola Margaret. Love the way you told us she’s a child by the chewing of the bunny ears. Well done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

  4. Oh oh, never enter the monkey house! Sounds like nothing good is about to go down….

  5. larry trasciatti – Wyoming Pa. – I was born in northeastern Pa. raised in N.Y. and lived in Pa.~and am now back in N.Y. I am a member of the Lay Carmelites of Baldwin N.Y.(used to be in Northeastern Pa. ) Give my blog a chance please. It includes all sorts of personal references, prose, poetry, and other miscellaneous thingies.
    larry trasciatti says:

    The story has such a dark, foreboding, ominous tone to it. Let’s hope Lola at least gets to see her mother.

  6. I love how this can go either way, depending on the darkness of the reader… yet, you do seem to draw us closer to the darker side… Hallowe’en vibe, I’m thinking!

  7. Alicia Jamtaas – Bellingham – Early in life, Alicia wrapped her fingers around a pencil, put lead to note paper and began stringing words together in an effort to form perfect sentences that sparkled like glistening glass beads on a necklace. One word, two words, three - a sentence. One sentence connected to another - a paragraph, four. The thrill of paragraph after paragraph blending (gently or with great power) into a page, a chapter, a manuscript.
    Alicia Jamtaas says:

    OH! I don’t think things are going to go well for our Lola. OR she’s found what she’s been looking for. Either way, great take on the prompt.

    (P.S. which were (was?) threadbare)

      1. Alicia Jamtaas – Bellingham – Early in life, Alicia wrapped her fingers around a pencil, put lead to note paper and began stringing words together in an effort to form perfect sentences that sparkled like glistening glass beads on a necklace. One word, two words, three - a sentence. One sentence connected to another - a paragraph, four. The thrill of paragraph after paragraph blending (gently or with great power) into a page, a chapter, a manuscript.
        Alicia Jamtaas says:

        Been there, done that, time and time again.

  8. 4963andypop – Florida, USA – My name is Andrea LeDew. I write poetry and short fiction and try my hand at longer works, all while acting as caretaker for my adult son with autism. I live in North Florida and blog on For Random Learning Comes. My blog is a window, looking into our ten-year homeschooling journey; my experiences parenting and caregiving in the orbit of disability; our joys and sorrows as a large family, and my take on the crazy world going on around us. I value family and friends, beautiful gardens, reading, fine chocolates, and travel. Way back in college, I studied English, German and law and now I consider myself an eternal student. I believe we must always be ready to learn, For Random Learning Comes!
    4963andypop says:

    Love the first sentence and the chewed bunny ear. You really give us a feeling for how vulnerable she is. The man in the black suit knowing her name could mean recognition and recovery of a lost child, or final success in luring her into his lair.

  9. Abhijit Ray – I am an amateur blogger. This is a blog about my thoughts about my life and my society. Thoughts that make me happy and thoughts that make me sad and angry. Blogging helps me express my views on events. Read my posts. Share your thoughts.
    Abhijit Ray says:

    What is Lola getting into? Something ominous!

  10. Oooo, methinks she’s finally going to fulfill her destiny by embarking on an epic quest 🙂

  11. James McEwan – I enjoy writing short stories as they take a concentrated discipline to write. I also like reading a well crafted piece that give provide pleasure through the words. I am the author of two short story collections, The Case of the Mahjong Dragon and The Listener. I have also published on CafeLit, Literally Stories and Fiction on the Web. My aim as a writer is to entertain and captivate readers with enjoyable moments of escapism in an imaginary world. Read my Flash Fiction on my site: jplmcewan.wordpress.com Fiction illuminates the truth.
    James McEwan says:

    I liked the idea of a child finding her destiny, but could she forget her mother?

  12. I loved the insight of this lost little girl, I could temporarily see the world through her eyes. How terrifying statues are when you are small and scared. 🙂

  13. There’s a tendril of menace that keeps spreading through the lines culminating with that chilling sentence. Scary and fantastic, Jennifer.

  14. pennygadd51 – United Kingdom – I write. I've written many pieces of flash fiction, dozens of short stories and two novels, with a third in progress.
    pennygadd51 says:

    At first I was thinking Lola was a child, but then it occurred to me that she might in fact be elderly and suffering from dementia. It’s a good mysterious story to think about!

  15. Stu – I am 100% Creative. I follow my passions: Conceptualizer, Professional Storyteller; Published author, NYS Certified Drama Teacher, Teaching Artist of Theater Arts, and Creative Writing. Arts organizer with an entrepreneurial spirit.
    StuHN says:

    Run, Lola, Run. Hope she makes it out of there. Pale-faced men are bad juju.

  16. Russell Gayer – NW Arkansas – Russell Gayer has two fans. One is a 12” 3-speed oscillator made by Westinghouse in 1967 and the other features a tongue-depressor handle and picture of Jesus. Most of his life has been frittered away in the pursuit of laziness and procrastination, both of which slip through his grasp since he refuses to put forth the energy to close his palm. In his made-for-tv-reality-show lifetime, Russell has been a dashing rock-star wanna be, a starving carpenter, a Hall of Shame softball player, and a poor excuse for a fisherman. His only saving grace is marrying way over his head. The fact that poor, sweet Connie has tolerated his antics since 1975 is a testament to her angelic patience and sympathetic heart. His grown children, Greta and Jesse, look at their Dad and shake their heads, praying that most of their DNA came from Mom.
    Russell Gayer says:

    I rarely agree with C.E., but he’s absolutely right. This is both scary and expertly crafted. Well done, Jennifer.

  17. Björn Rudberg (brudberg) – I love to write poetry in all forms and matters. Almost unpublished but busy writing poetry daily. Love to see the music and color in words and grab my poetic license with English.
    Björn Rudberg (brudberg) says:

    So very chilling… love the sweet bunny imagery… but the pale man is chilling…

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